For Taylor Swift, the Future of Music Is a Love Story

“A friend of mine, who is an actress, told me that when the casting for her recent movie came down to two actresses, the casting director chose the actress with  more Twitter followers. I see this becoming a trend in the music industry. For me, this dates back to 2005 when I walked into my first record-label meetings, explaining to them that I had been communicating directly with my fans on this new site called Myspace. In the future, artists will get record deals because they have fans–not the other way around.”

[…]

“I predict some things will never change. There will always be an increasing fixation on the private lives of musicians, especially the younger ones. Artists who were at their commercial peak in the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s tell me, “It was never this crazy for us back then!” And I suspect I’ll be saying that same thing to younger artists someday (God help them). There continues to be a bad girl vs. good girl/clean-cut vs. sexy debate, and for as long as those labels exist, I just hope there will be contenders on both sides. Everyone needs someone to relate to.”

via The Wall Street Journal | For Taylor Swift, the Future of Music Is a Love Story

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Thoughts on being a lady | Zoë Keating

I’ve used little strategies to get around the tiny biases. For example, I can get more favorable licensing terms by having a client negotiate via email with my pseudonymous male manager “Marc”. Or, on the occasion I’ve been made to sound like a viola onstage, I smile and subtly demonstrate that I understand acoustics by cheerfully mentioning to the soundman how quirky the cello is, that its lowest note is 65hz and that the notch for my resonant frequency should be very narrow because rolling off everything below 160hz will make a cello sound like a viola. Or, prevented by drinking laws from bringing my still-nursing 6 month old into my dressing room (where I needed to nurse him to sleep before going onstage), I just snuck him into the venue under my coat.

via Thoughts on being a lady | Zoë Keating.

Pink In Open Letter To Fans: “Kiss My Entire… Ass” – hypebot

The fact that I don’t get the benefit of the doubt from you saddens me. There is no way I can make up this date. There isn’t a way. And for any of you that believe in me, please know we did everything we could to try to make it happen. Everything. It’s a logistical nightmare that is again, out of my control.

And guess what? I might actually get sick again on this tour. Can you imagine it? How dare I even think that? I have a two year old who is building her immune system by getting sick all over the place. And the fact that I even went on tour while being a full time mom is a miracle in itself.

The next time I schedule dates- ill have to say to myself- “if, God forbid I have to cancel one show, those fans will turn on me like rabid dogs and question the moral fabric of my character.”

via Pink In Open Letter To Fans: “Kiss My Entire… Ass” – hypebot.

Why I Was Banned From Speaking At San Francisco Music Tech #SFMUSICTECH | The Trichordist

The fundamental American right is Free Speech. SF Music Tech (and Silicon Valley in general) do not really respect this right. Especially when it begins to interfere with their bottom line.

So what do you say we just end the charade? SF Music Tech Summit is biased against creators/musicians and their rights. It’s a pro-tech industry event.  It’s held in the Kabuki Hotel in San Francisco.  Because it is a giant Kabuki.

Three times a year  you find Tech Industry “entrepreneurs” who’ve never turned a profit “debate” un-elected artists rights advocates who as it turns out work for opaque 501C  foundations and organizations  that are funded by technology companies like Google.

via Why I Was Banned From Speaking At San Francisco Music Tech #SFMUSICTECH | The Trichordist.

Nimbit.com | How to Win & Engage Fans on Facebook – SXSW Presentation

I was invited to give a presentation on Best Practices for Musicians on Facebook last week at SXSW and thought it would be helpful to share my slides from the talk and some audio excerpts that were posted online for those who couldn’t make it to the conference.

I tried to tailor this talk toward practical things that you can do today. In particular, I spent a bit of time on how to optimize your page using the new Timeline view, now that Facebook is changing all Band/Musician pages to this format on 3/31/2012. I also spoke about the three voices you can use in your status updates to keep things interesting, and some strategies you can use to grow your fanbase both in the realworld at Gigs and using Facebook advertising.

Carl Jacobson from Nimbet’s slide deck.